Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology

By Edwin A. Fleishman | Go to book overview

graphical plot and juggling the link values around in proper manner, a proposed solution to the particular systems problem is obtained.

This approach to systems design is admittedly qualitative in some respects and not rigorously scientific. Whether or not we have here the essence of a basic and valid theoretical construct is not yet clear. On the other hand this approach has been used in a number of military circumstances and has been found to increase the over-all efficiency of complicated men-machine linkages. Further research and application by motion-and-time engineers and psychologists is needed to demonstrate both its generality and its limitations.


62. Psychology and the Design
of Machines*

Franklin V. Taylor

PSYCHOLOGISTS HAVE been helping engineers design machines for more than fifteen years. It all began during World War II with the rapid development of radars, sonars, aircraft control systems, and other similar devices. Previous to this time, the only role played by psychologists relative to military mechanisms was that of doing research and giving advice on the selection and training of the operators. However, very early in the war, it became apparent that these Procrustean attempts to fit the man to the machine were not enough. Regardless of how much he could be stretched by training or pared down through selection, there were still many military equipments which the man just could not be moulded to fit. They required of him too many hands, too many feet, or in the case of some of the more complex devices, too many heads.

Sometimes they called for the operator to see targets which were close to invisible, or to understand speech in the presence of deafening noise, to track simultaneously in three coordinates with the two hands, to solve in analogue form complex differential equations, or to consider large amounts of information and to reach life-and-death decisions in split seconds and with no hope of another try. Of course the man often failed in one or another of these tasks. As a result, bombs and bullets often missed their mark, planes crashed, friendly ships were fired upon and sunk. Whales were depth-charged.

____________________
*
Selected portions from "Psychology and the Design of Machines," American Psychologist, Vol. 12, No. 5, 1957, pp. 249-56.

-590-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in Personnel and Industrial Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 638

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.