Language of Vision

By Gyorgy Kepes; S. Giedion et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

First of all the author wishes to acknowledge his indebtedness to the Gestalt psychologists. Many of the inspiring ideas and concrete illustrations of Max Whertheimer, K. Koffka, and W. Kohler, have been used in the first part of the book to explain the laws of visual organization.

The author also acknowledges his gratitude to his publisher, his students, his colleagues, and his friends, for their encouragement and generous help in solving the many creative and technical problems related to this book.

Adeline Cross, Britton Harris, Ann Horn, Eva Manzardo, R. B. Tague, and Mollie Thwaites, and particularly Katinka Loeserand Helen Van de Woestynegave invaluable aid in the painstaking work of revising and reformulating the text. The author wishes also to thank Professors Charles Morrisand S. I. Hayakawawho read the manuscript and gave helpful criticisms. It would have been an arduous, if not an impossible, task to illustrate this book properly without the help of the students of the author, his colleagues, and the members of the staffs of leading museums. To these the author and the publisher wish to express their sincere gratitude. Our special thanks are due to Miss Frances Pernasof the Museum of Modern Artfor her unfailing courtesies; to Frank Levstik, Jr., and Hans Richterfor their efforts; to Carl O. Schniewindand Walter J. Sherwoodof the Art Institute of Chicago; to Peggy Guggenheimof the Art of this Century; to Baroness Rebayof the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation; to J. B. Lippincott & Co., Charles Downsof Abbott Laboratories for the loan of several engravings; to Egbert Jacobsonof Container Corporation of America, Harry Collinsof Collins, Miller, and Hutchings, R. D. Middletonand Dr. R. L. Leslie for their aid with illustrations and for their contributions of engravings.

COPYRIGHT 1944 BY PAUL THEOBALD, CHICAGO ALL RIGHTS RESERVED ● FIRST EDITION

PRINTED AND BOUND IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BY THE WISCONSIN CUNEO PRESS ● MILWAUKEE

-4-

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Language of Vision
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgements 4
  • Contents 5
  • Art Means Reality 6
  • The Revision of Vision 8
  • Ii. Visual Representation 65
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