Great Mambo Chicken and the Transhuman Condition: Science Slightly over the Edge

By Ed Regis | Go to book overview

4
Omnipotence, Plenitude
& Co.

When the first people were getting themselves frozen, back in the sixties and seventies, no one had any more than the dimmest notion as to what it would take to get you back up and running again. Actually there was a way in which this didn't really matter, because it wasn't going to be your problem: you'd be down there in the cryonics tank and in no condition to worry about resurrection day or anything else. Leave that little detail to others, to the Eternal Engineers. The important thing was that science and technology would be making their usual hubristic strides in the interim, so while you were sleeping your way through the decades, scientists, researchers, and advanced thinkers of every stripe would be learning about nature the way they always had, until finally the reanimation of frozen bodies was as routine as a heart transplant.

It called for a special brand of optimism to think this way, perhaps, but it wasn't really a matter of having blind faith in science. Or if it was a faith, it was the kind that Keith Henson had spoken of as "the faith of Goddard."

"Goddard knew from calculation that the moon was in reach," Henson once said. "There were only two things about Apollo that might have surprised him. It occurred much sooner than he thought it would, and he would have been dismayed that we didn't stay there."

-109-

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Great Mambo Chicken and the Transhuman Condition: Science Slightly over the Edge
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • The Mania 1
  • 1 - Truax 10
  • 2 - Home on Lagrange 44
  • 3 - Heads Will Roll 76
  • 4 - Omnipotence, Plenitude & Co. 109
  • 5 - Postbiological Man 144
  • 6 - The Artificial Life 4-H Show 177
  • 7 - Hints for the Better Operation of the Universe 207
  • 8 - Death of the Impossible 238
  • 9 - Laissez Le Bon Temps Rouler 266
  • Epilogue 280
  • Acknowledgments 290
  • Selected Sources 291
  • Index 302
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