President Reagan: The Role of a Lifetime

By Lou Cannon | Go to book overview

17
MORNING AGAIN IN AMERICA

Ours is the land of the free because it is the home of the brave. America's future will always be great because our nation will always be strong. And our nation will be strong because our people will be free. And our people will be free because we will be united, one people under God, with liberty and justice for all.

RONALD REAGAN, NOVEMBER 4, 19841

IN BETWEEN THE JOURNEYS to Normandy and to Bitburg, Ronald Reagan won a second term as president by the largest electoral-vote landslide in U.S. history. He carried 49 states, receiving 525 electoral votes to 10 for Democratic nominee Walter F. Mondale, who carried his home state of Minnesota by less than one percentage point and also won the District of Columbia. Reagan won 59 percent of the popular vote. He gained a majority in every region of the country, in every age group, in cities, towns, suburbs, and rural areas and in every occupational category except the unemployed. Sixty-one percent of independents and a quarter of registered Democrats voted for Reagan. He won the votes of 62 percent of the men and 54 percent of the women, even though Mondale set a precedent by choosing Geraldine Ferraro as his running mate. Reagan's showing was an improvement from 1980, when only 47 percent of women had voted for him. A polling analyst concluded that the "gender gap" had damaged Mondale, who "had bigger problems with male voters than Reagan had with females." 2 Reagan had majorities among every ethnic group except Hispanics, where he increased his percentage of the vote from 37 percent to 44 percent. He won a majority among voters earning $10,000 or more a year and a majority among whites earning more than $5,000. Sixty-three percent of all white voters cast their ballots for Reagan-- and 73 percent of white Protestants. Fifty-six percent of Catholics voted for Reagan. Mondale won the votes of two out of three Jewish voters and nearly nine out of ten blacks. He became only the second Democratic presidential

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President Reagan: The Role of a Lifetime
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Also by Lou Cannon ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface to the 1991 Edition ix
  • Preface to the 2000 Edition xi
  • 1 - Back to the Future 1
  • 2 - A Reagan Portrait 16
  • 3 - The Acting Politician 20
  • 4 - The Acting President 31
  • 5 - Offstage Influences 45
  • 6 - Heroic Dreams 66
  • 7 - Halcyon Days 78
  • 8 - Kidding on the Square 95
  • 9 - Hail to the Chief 115
  • 10 - Passive President 141
  • 11 - The Loner 172
  • 12 - Staying the Course 196
  • 13 - Focus of Evil 240
  • 14 - Freedom Fighters 289
  • 15 - Lost in Lebanon 339
  • 16 - An Actor Abroad 402
  • 17 - Morning Again in America 434
  • 18 - Turning Point 488
  • 19 - Darkness at Noon 521
  • 20 - Struggles at Twilight 580
  • 21 - The New Era 663
  • 22 - Visions and Legacies 711
  • Notes 765
  • Bibliography 820
  • Acknowledgments 835
  • Index 843
  • About the Author 885
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