Philosophy and Its Epistemic Neuroses

By Michael Hymers | Go to book overview

ural resources in order to understand me. We will have to bend our languages if we are serious about understanding each other. Failures of communication may well be the norm rather than the exception here, and this is not inconsequential. But there is no "philosophical" problem about how communication is possible for us, for our differences are readily comprehensible -- I have just described them.


Notes
1.
For similar charges see Farrell 1994, 117-47.
2.
See also 1991b, 24, 25, 49-51, 202; 1982, 167; and 1993, 450, 457.
3.
See Putnam 1981, 119-24 for a more thorough version of the self-refutation argument. See also Putnam 1983, 234-38, where Rorty is miscast as the relativist.
4.
See, e.g., Rorty 1982, 167 and Putnam 1981, 120.
5.
I also suspect that Smith's proposal that we adopt "an alternate structure of conceptions of what [the objectivist] calls 'truth'" ( 1988, 113) is apt to sound to the strong objectivist like just another theory, perhaps analogous to eliminative materialism in the philosophy of mind. Is this point decisive? Perhaps not. I can say only that the philosophers (and my own earlier selves) with whom I have discussed such issues seem at least to see the possibility of modest realism if it is so labeled, whereas the label relativist typically inspires their suspicion. There is, I think, no substitute for emphasizing that truth and knowledge neither need nor are amenable to theoreticization. So I say it again.
6.
In fairness, it is not clear to me that either Seller or Trebilcot is unequivocally committed to epistemic relativism. Many of Seller's arguments for relativism seem really to be arguments against scientism, and Trebilcot remarks at one point that her main concern is with "methods for using language" ( 1988, 1). It is primarily the rhetoric associated with claims to know the truth that seems to bother her.
7.
This is confirmed in Trebilcot's case when she says, I think . . . that I can imagine being with, communicating with, another being with whom I share no beliefs" ( 1990, 142). The importance of shared belief will become clearer below.
8.
See "Lagos men"; "Nigerians fear"; "Vanishing organs". Similar events were more recently reported in Accra, Ghana. See "Vanishing penises".
9.
"Sex organ scare."
10.
The Reuters report is somewhat more reserved.
11.
"Lagos men".
12.
The proliferation of reports in Western nations, particularly the United States, by people who claim -- seemingly sincerely -- to have been abducted by extraterrestrial beings is surely no less bizarre than stories of genital theft. But such stories seldom provoke any recourse to conceptual relativism.
13.
See also my 1997a.
14.
See D'Amico 1989, 32f. for his account of Carnap's influence.
15.
Carnap came to prefer a language of physics to one of sense data for observation statements, but not because he saw the choice as a "cognitive" one and not because he saw talk of physical objects as constitutive of the meaningfulness of our words. Physicalist language is preferable to phenomenalist language because of its "intersubjectivity, i.e., the fact that the events described in this language are in principle observable by all users of the

-124-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Philosophy and Its Epistemic Neuroses
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction: Philosophy and Neurosis 1
  • Notes 11
  • 1 - The "External" World 12
  • Notes 33
  • 2 - Internal Relations 36
  • Notes 53
  • 3 - Truth and Reference 57
  • Notes 77
  • 4 - Renouncing All Theory 80
  • Notes 100
  • 5 - Conceptual Schemes 103
  • Notes 124
  • 6 - The Ethical-Political Argument 127
  • Notes 148
  • 7 - Realism and Self-Knowledge 151
  • Notes 169
  • 8 - Self-Knowledge and Self-Unity 173
  • Notes 190
  • Conclusion: the Rhetoric of Neurosis 193
  • Notes 199
  • Credits 201
  • Reference List 202
  • Index 213
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.