Philosophy and Its Epistemic Neuroses

By Michael Hymers | Go to book overview

Amnesia and the familiar feeling of "I just got dropped in here somehow" enabled Jo to see how this improbable hypothesis served as an analogy for her life. She figured that she could be a very contented mind-in-a-vat, but Lynn had forced her to accept she wasn't alone in a vat or in her body. This was a problem that she could not puzzle. ( Casey and Wilson 1991, 85)


Notes
1.
Cf. Williams 1996c, 111.
2.
"By a new notation no facts of geography are changed" ( Wittgenstein 1958, 57).
3.
Since 1980 the American Psychiatric Association has recognized a number of "dissociative disorders." This classification now includes such maladies as dissociative identity disorder (formerly multiple personality disorder), dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, and depersonalization disorder. These are all disorders that would once have been classified as "neuroses," since their sufferers retain some grip on reality and can be conscious of their troubles, though unable to overcome them without help. See American Psychiatric Association 1994, 477-81.
4.
Let me reiterate my caution of Chapter 8 that my view does not take the reality of multiple personality disorder for granted, though I do find compelling Hacking's carefully qualified conclusion that multiple personality is "a way to be crazy, at least in an industrial/romantic, Protestant society" ( 1991, 844).

-199-

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Philosophy and Its Epistemic Neuroses
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction: Philosophy and Neurosis 1
  • Notes 11
  • 1 - The "External" World 12
  • Notes 33
  • 2 - Internal Relations 36
  • Notes 53
  • 3 - Truth and Reference 57
  • Notes 77
  • 4 - Renouncing All Theory 80
  • Notes 100
  • 5 - Conceptual Schemes 103
  • Notes 124
  • 6 - The Ethical-Political Argument 127
  • Notes 148
  • 7 - Realism and Self-Knowledge 151
  • Notes 169
  • 8 - Self-Knowledge and Self-Unity 173
  • Notes 190
  • Conclusion: the Rhetoric of Neurosis 193
  • Notes 199
  • Credits 201
  • Reference List 202
  • Index 213
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