Philosophy and Its Epistemic Neuroses

By Michael Hymers | Go to book overview

Reference List

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Althusser, Louis. 1969. For Marx. Trans. Ben Brewster. New York: Pantheon Books.

____. 1971. Lenin and Philosophy and Other Essays. Trans. Ben Brewster. New York: Monthly Review Press.

American Psychiatric Association. 1994. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 4th ed. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association.

Anderson, David. 1992. "What Is Realistic About Putnam's Internal Realism?" Philosophical Topics 20: 49-83.

Anzaldúa, Gloria. 1987. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. San Francisco: Spinsters/Aunt Lute.

Appiah, Anthony. 1985. "The Uncompleted Argument: Du Bois and the Illusion of Race". Critical Inquiry 12: 21-37.

Arrington, Robert L. 1996. "Ontological Commitment". In Arrington and Glock, eds. ( 1996), 196-211.

Arrington, Robert L., and Hans-Johann Glock, eds. 1996. Wittgenstein and Quine. London: Routledge.

Austin, J. L. 1964. "Truth." In Pitcher, ed. ( 1964), 18-31.

Ayer, A. J. 1952. Language, Truth and Logic. 2nd ed. New York: Dover.

____. ed. 1959. Logical Positivism. Glencoe, Ill.: The Free Press.

Baier, Annette. 1986. "Trust and Antitrust". Ethics 96: 231-260.

Baker, G. P., and P. M. S. Hacker. 1984a. Language, Sense and Nonsense. Oxford: Blackwell.

____. 1984b. Scepticism, Rules and Language. Oxford: Blackwell.

1985. Wittgenstein: Rules, Grammar and Necessity. Oxford: Blackwell.

Barnes, Barry, and David Bloor. 1982. "Relativism, Rationalism and the Sociology of Knowledge". In Hollis and Lukes, eds. ( 1982), 21-47.

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Baynes, Kenneth, James Bohman, and Thomas McCarthy, eds. 1987. After Philosophy: End or Transformation? Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

Benton, Ted. 1984. The Rise and Fall of Structural Marxism: Althusser and His Influence. London: Macmillan1.

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Philosophy and Its Epistemic Neuroses
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction: Philosophy and Neurosis 1
  • Notes 11
  • 1 - The "External" World 12
  • Notes 33
  • 2 - Internal Relations 36
  • Notes 53
  • 3 - Truth and Reference 57
  • Notes 77
  • 4 - Renouncing All Theory 80
  • Notes 100
  • 5 - Conceptual Schemes 103
  • Notes 124
  • 6 - The Ethical-Political Argument 127
  • Notes 148
  • 7 - Realism and Self-Knowledge 151
  • Notes 169
  • 8 - Self-Knowledge and Self-Unity 173
  • Notes 190
  • Conclusion: the Rhetoric of Neurosis 193
  • Notes 199
  • Credits 201
  • Reference List 202
  • Index 213
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