Race and Ethnic Conflict: Contending Views on Prejudice, Discrimination, and Ethnoviolence

By Fred L. Pincus; Howard J. Ehrlich | Go to book overview

Introduction

Much has happened in the area of race and ethnic relations since the first edition of our book was published in 1994. The changes in this edition reflect the changes in society and the writing about it.

We begin this book by summarizing our own observations. The first is that prejudice and discrimination against racial/ethnic groups in American society is still a serious problem. In spite of considerable civil rights legislation and government programs intended to minimize inequality, white Americans still have greater op- portunities than all others. Discrimination persists; group tensions are on the rise.

The second observation is that there has been a change in the dominant mode of expression of prejudice. The ethnic group stereotypes of an earlier day were rooted in beliefs about the biological differences among people. Today, there is no longer a widespread or strongly held sense of biological inferiority. There is, rather, a sense of "cultural" difference. So, for example, minority groups are not rejected because they are seen as innately inferior but because their "lifestyle" is unacceptable. Further, the stereotypes of an earlier day were far more hateful and far more cruel than those of today. Today one seldom encounters people who regard the Japanese as cruel, sly, and treacherous or who fear Jews because they kidnap young children for ritual blood sacrifices. Fewer people today accept the gross, negative ethnic group stereotypes than at the time of the civil rights movement.

Third, there has been a reduction in the amount of discrimination. Changes have occurred in the motivation of people to discriminate against others in everyday settings. In public accommodations, in schools and in workplaces, in voting and political officeholding, major improvements have occurred in this society. To be sure, neighborhood segregation persists in almost all cities and has gotten worse in many. School segregation continues, although it is based more on residential patterns than on legal mandates. Intergroup friendships that cross ethnic and racial lines are still not as frequent as intragroup friendships. Although the prevailing social norms still prescribe considerable social distance between many ethnically different people in intimate settings, much less distance is prescribed in public and casual settings. This, too, is a major change in norms from the period of the civil rights movement. Remember that the civil rights struggles of the 1950s began over issues of where to sit in a bus or at a lunch counter. Public transportation and restaurants are now open to all. Barriers to participation in electoral politics have mainly been removed.

The fourth observation is that the level of violence motivated by prejudice is high and has been increasing through the 1980s and 1990s. This form of violence, which

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race and Ethnic Conflict: Contending Views on Prejudice, Discrimination, and Ethnoviolence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 466

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.