Race and Ethnic Conflict: Contending Views on Prejudice, Discrimination, and Ethnoviolence

By Fred L. Pincus; Howard J. Ehrlich | Go to book overview

places and have seriously compromised educational standards? Does the fact that 33 percent of respondents said they might move, and 21 percent said they would move, if large numbers of blacks came to live in their neighborhoods support the contention that a majority of whites reject integration "in practice"? Or does it reflect a concern that the "large numbers of blacks" may contain many members of the underclass? Very few people from the middle class, whether white or black, see such people as desirable neighbors. In fact, in a poll of residential preferences in the Detroit area in 1976, only 11 percent of blacks responded that they would prefer to live in a neighborhood where the residents were "all black" or "mostly black." 67 In truth, the hard data that forms the foundation for the current argument about racial attitudes is so fraught with difficulties that just about any interpretation can be gotten from it. And yet it is on these grounds that many social scientists charge white Americans with resisting racial equality. . . .


NOTES
15.
Donald R. Kinder, "The Continuing American Dilemma: White Resistance to Racial Change Forty Years after Myrdal." Journal of Social Issues, vol. 42., no. 2 ( 1986), pp. 151-52.
16.
Howard Schuman, Charlotte Steeh, and Lawrence Bobo, Racial Attitudes in America ( Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1985), p. 77.
23.
Paul F. Lazarsfeld and Wagner Thielens, Jr., with David Riesman, The Academic Mind: Social Scientists in a Time of Crisis (Glencoe, IL: Free Press, 1958).
33.
"Politics of the Professoriate." American Enterprise, July/August 1991, p. 87.
38.
Paul M. Sniderman and Michael Gray Hagen, Race and Inequality: A Study in American Values (Chatham, NJ: Chatham House, 1985), p. 97.
44.
"A Portrait in Black and White." American Enterprise, January/February 1990, p. 100.
45.
James Kluegel and Eliot Smith, "Affirmative Action Attitudes: Effects of Self-Interest, Racial Affect, and Stratification Beliefs on Whites' Views." Social Forces, vol. 6. no. 3 ( March 1983), p. 801.
46.
See Kinder, "The Continuing American Dilemma."
47.
Donald R. Kinder and David O. Sears, "Prejudice and Politics: Symbolic Racism versus Racial Threats to the Good Life." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 40, no. 3 ( 1981), p. 416.
57.
Kinder and Sears, "Prejudice and Politics," p. 417.

-87-

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