Race and Ethnic Conflict: Contending Views on Prejudice, Discrimination, and Ethnoviolence

By Fred L. Pincus; Howard J. Ehrlich | Go to book overview

All forms of integration are depicted as part of a great plan to encourage interracial relationships. For example, one typical article argues that "integration is just a code word for racemixing. Civil rights for Black men do not really mean equal employment opportunities; they mean equal enjoyment opportunities with White women" ( National Vanguard May 1979, 11).

White supremacist publications berate white men for failing to protect white women. For example, a typical article argues that

Northern European males have traditionally tended throughout history to be dominant by nature, but . . . they are becoming submissive and passive. This phenomenon is especially obvious in the declining strength of their opposition to the interracial sexual transgressions of non-Northern European males with Northern European females. [Northern European men] repress the natural inborn tendencies of exclusivity which played an important role in preserving the biological integrity of their race during its evolution. Many carry their altruism to the point of even seeming to approve of, and to encourage, the sexual trespasses of non-Northern European males upon Northern European females whom their more vigorous and race-conscious ancestors would have defended from such defilements with their very lives. ( Instauration June 1980, 8)

This demasculinization is frequently blamed on feminism and minority social movements for challenging racial and gender inequality. In an article titled "Sexuality in a Sick Society" and subtitled "The changing relationship between men and women is leading to ominous racial consequences for the West," we are told that feminism and the sexual revolution has led to the

demasculinization of the Western male, [and] together with the reaction of the Western female to this, [it] is a cause for grave concern. . . . [Men] are constrained from expressing their maleness in any of the ways which were natural in the past. One of the most important of those ways was protecting a mate . . . [but now he is no longer] the master in his house. ( National Vanguard January 1983, 17)

The problem, then, is the perversion of the "natural" racial and gender order, where white men rule over women and nonwhites. So what is the solution? White supremacists argue that we need more "real men" to reclaim white women and reassert control and that the separation of the races is the only way to secure the future of the white race.

The white supremacist project, then, is primarily concerned with forging white male identity and restoring the "natural relationship that existed between the sexes [and races] in earlier times" ( National Vanguard January 1983, 21). Clearly, the contemporary white supremacist movement organizes to maintain not only white power but white male power. Conversely, those seeking to organize against racist and misogynist injustice must work together to combat these movements.


CONCLUSION

Contemporary scholars are increasingly arguing that white supremacist ideology is not as "extremist" as we like to think ( Daniels 1997; Ferber 1995, 1998). In

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