Documents of American Prejudice: An Anthology of Writings on Race from Thomas Jefferson to David Duke

By S. T. Joshi | Go to book overview

50
The Race Question in
the United States

BY SENATOR JOHN T. MORGAN

John Tyler Morgan ( 1824-1907) served in the Civil War on the Confederate side and later served as U.S. Senator (Democrat) from Alabama from 1876 to the end of his life. In "The Race Question in the United States" ( 1890) Morgan asserts the obvious inferiority of the "negro race" and holds that radical segregation of the races is the only remedy to the race problem, since white women will never countenance the marriage of their sons or daughters to an African American.

ALL THE OTHER NATIONS HAVE, with good cause, regarded the negroes as an inferior race, aside from all the physical distinctions by which they are separated from all other races of men. It was this estimate of their condition that led the great powers of Europe to enter into the Berlin Conference, which fixed the boundaries of the Congo Free State--a vast and beautiful country abounding in natural resources--and secure to the negro race immunity from foreign invasion, that they might become a civilized people. The negro race, in their native land, have never made a voluntary and concerted effort to rise above the plane of slavery; they have not contributed a thought, or a labor, except by compulsion, to aid the progress of civilization. Nothing has emanated from the negroes of Africa, in art, science, or enterprise that has been of the least service to mankind. Their own history, at home, demonstrates their inferiority when compared with that of other peoples.

-301-

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