Wobbly, the Rough-And-Tumble Story of an American Radical

By Ralph Chaplin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10. MEXICAN INTERLUDE AND
A BLACKLIST

THAT journey to Mexico City proved to be something more than an escape from the cramped environment of Chicago. It was more than the revolutionary pilgrimage I had dreamed of in the office of the International Socialist Review. There was color everywhere, dazzling sunshine, and the sharp shadows of eaves over narrow cobbled streets. If there was misery there, I did not see it at first glance. Even the sombreroed and seraped Indians trotting behind clattering burros seemed more lighthearted than the wage slaves of Gary or South Chicago.

The larger cities, Monterrey, San Luis Potosí, and even Querétaro, were saturated with the flavor of Old Spain. Between the cities were wide stretches of desert dotted with tiny adobe towns and weird clusters of cactus. Time after time, burning blue mountain ranges thrust upward little by little from a sandy horizon. How beautiful was this gracious and exploited land! And how I wished that someone were along to enjoy its beauty with me, Edith who could not be persuaded to accompany me, or the Count, who had shouted

"See you in Mexicol"
when he saw me off at the depot after my brief stopover at Memphis.

My first glimpse of Mexico City was most impressive. It was just dusk. The coach had filled up with well-dressed Mexican families all chattering in Spanish. There was much laughter. A young army officer was strumming a guitar. From Tacuba to the Federal District it was like a picnic. From the Estación Central to Hotel Clark it was like riding into utopia. So deeply was I impressed with the charm of Mexico City that it took weeks before I became aware of the human misery in which much of that charm was rooted.

The studio was called Casa Americana Amplificadora de Retratos

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wobbly, the Rough-And-Tumble Story of an American Radical
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 435

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.