Wobbly, the Rough-And-Tumble Story of an American Radical

By Ralph Chaplin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 22. "HELL'S FORTY ACRES"

WE SIGHTED the penitentiary late that afternoon. At first it was a thin white line in the distance. Then it disappeared behind a hill. We passed through the town of Leavenworth and came to a stop in front of a red-brick wall fully forty feet high and stretching as far as we could see. A huge double‐ barred door swung open to admit the train as we pulled into a siding within the enclosure. The gates swung shut again. As we stepped out of the coaches, machine guns were trained on us from all directions. Unkempt, unwashed, and with a two weeks' growth of beard, we were no doubt a tough-looking bunch. As we marched double file into the prison yard, I heard a rough voice say, "There come the sons-of-bitches now." We found ourselves in a miniature high-walled city of red-brick streets and buildings. The cell blocks stood massive in the distance, and over all the grimy boiler-house reared its tall smokestack into a cloudless blue sky.

We were stripped of our civilian clothing and fitted with numbered prison garments, each of us receiving a gray dress uniform with cap and brass buttons, a work suit of faded dungarees and jacket, a hickory shirt, cotton-flannel underwear, two pairs of socks, and a couple of handkerchiefs. As a special favor we were permitted to wear our own shoes. The numbers were stenciled on patches sewed just above each knee on the trousers and on the back of coats and jackets. Mine was 13104. They had started with 13101 in order to make our group easy to identify among the mass of inmates . Andreytchine was 13101. Haywood happened to be 13106.

Next we went to the deputy's office to be assigned to our prison work and permanent cells. The barred anteroom was crowded. A dozen or more of us, including Bill Haywood, were

-250-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wobbly, the Rough-And-Tumble Story of an American Radical
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 435

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.