Wobbly, the Rough-And-Tumble Story of an American Radical

By Ralph Chaplin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 24. CAPTAIN EDDY IN CHAINS.
BUTCHERING OF THE "BULL." PRISON RIOT

AS THE war reached its peak, military prisoners began to arrive in ever increasing numbers. One day, while a large contingent of court-martial victims from overseas were lined up awaiting admission to the prison, somebody hung a sheet from a front-wall window on which had been daubed in black letters: "Welcome Home, Soldier!" There was a big to-do about that incident, but nothing was ever done about it.

Occasionally I would help out in the photographic department during the noon hour. One morning, while marching in line to the office, I had seen a young aviator being led in under special guard. He was heavily manacled. Handcuffs, anklets, and an iron band around the neck had been riveted on, and all three were connected with a dangling chain. He still wore a uniform of the U.S. Army and was carrying his rather unusual irons with a deprecating grin. Everybody, including "Bull" Leonard, remarked about the young man's pluck. An hour or two later in the record clerk's office, I was helping Wehde to fingerprint and photograph the new arrival. Tanner, in the blacksmith shop, had, we all hoped painlessly, hammered off the irons. Even in prison dungarees, "CaptainEddy" looked more like a soldier than a convict. We became acquainted at once. With both of us it was the kind of friendship that lasts. Captain Eddy explained that he had been an air corps instructor and that his sentence was life-imprisonment—plus ten years. I was anxious to learn more about him.

I had progressed in Mr. Reno's office to the point where I was now intrusted with precision analysis of disputed fingerprint patterns and points of identification from bromide enlargements. Also I had started to illustrate a book James Holt was writing on the subject. Furthermore, my work had been of such nature as to

-270-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wobbly, the Rough-And-Tumble Story of an American Radical
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 435

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.