Wobbly, the Rough-And-Tumble Story of an American Radical

By Ralph Chaplin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 36. ANOTHER WORLD CRISIS. A
FIGHTING CHANCE

IN MY work for Red Cross, U.S.O., and the War Chest I had met many preachers and had spoken in many churches, once or twice even pinch-hitting for Labor Day sermons. Once I spoke on the Lord's Prayer, pointing out human affairs would remain in a mess until God's will displaced the clashing wills of men in the troubled world. My "sermons" went over pretty well with the various Protestant congregations, but sometimes I had heated arguments with the parsons. Some of them labored under the illusion that bolshevism, in spite of blood purges and atheism, was akin to the communism of the primitive Christian church. Things like that convinced me that preachers needed talking to as much as wage-earners, employers, and professors. Matters of religious sectarianism interested me little and the parsons' notions about economics and social science less. All that I expected from the church was affirmation of the reality of God and guidance in a basic faith on which men of differing opinions and interests might agree.

Edith and I talked these matters over earnestly before we united with the First Congregational Church of Tacoma. Had it not been for one of my long-dead grandfathers, it might have been any other church. Hugh Chaplin, recorded as "the immigrant," had embarked from Hull, England, on the good ship "Joan" in the summer of 1638. He was one of a group of twenty Puritan families from Yorkshire who were following their pastor, Rev. Ezekiel Rogers, to New Rowley, Massachusetts, where they hoped to be free to worship God without interference by the state. In the record it is said of him:

" Hugh Chaplin became a Freeman, which previous to 1664 meant that they were members of the same Congregational Church, had taken the Freeman's oath and were thereby entitled to vote."

-420-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wobbly, the Rough-And-Tumble Story of an American Radical
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 435

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.