Myths and Legends of the Pacific Northwest

By Katharine Berry Judson | Go to book overview

MYTHS AND LEGENDS OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

SELECTED BY KATHARINE BERRYJUDSON

Introduction to the Bison Books Edition

by Jay Miller

University of Nebraska Press

Lincoln and London

-i-

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Myths and Legends of the Pacific Northwest
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Introduction 1
  • References 6
  • Preface 7
  • Table of Contents 15
  • Illustrations 17
  • The Origin of Daylight 19
  • How Silver-Fox Created The World 21
  • How Kemush Created the World 25
  • The Robe of Kemush 28
  • How Qawaneca Created The World 30
  • How Old Man Above Created The World 33
  • Old Man Above and the Grizzlies 35
  • Duration of Life 38
  • How Coyote Stole Fire 40
  • How Beaver Stole Fire 42
  • How Dog Stole Fire 44
  • The Bridge of the Gods 47
  • The Dalles 50
  • The Story of Ashish 51
  • Creation of Mankind 55
  • As-Ai-Yahal 56
  • The Golden Age 59
  • The First Totem Pole 60
  • Spirit of Snow 64
  • Owl and Raven 65
  • Cradle Song 66
  • Woodrat and Rabbits 67
  • Quarrel of Sun and Moon 69
  • Chinook Wind 70
  • The Miser of Takhoma 74
  • Why There Are No Snakes on Takhoma 79
  • Cry-Because-He-Had-No-Wife 81
  • How Coyote Got His Cunning 85
  • The Naming of Creation 86
  • The Bird Chief 87
  • The Spell of the Laughing Raven 88
  • Origin of the Thunder Bird 89
  • Mount Edgecomb, Alaska 91
  • An Indian's Vow to the Thunder Gods 92
  • Chinook Ghosts 95
  • The Memaloose Islands 98
  • A Visiting Ghost 100
  • Origin of the Tribes 102
  • How the Okanogans Became Red 105
  • The Copper Canoe 107
  • Origin of Mineral Springs 108
  • How the Ermine Got Its Necklace 109
  • Coyote and Grizzly 114
  • Coyote and the Dragon 116
  • Origin of Spokane Falls 118
  • Coyote in the Buffalo Counrty 119
  • Coyote and the Salmon 123
  • Falls of the Willamette 125
  • Tallapus and the Cedar 127
  • How Coyote Was Killed 131
  • Old Grizzly and Old Antelope 133
  • Legend of the Klickitat Basket 141
  • The Northern Lights 143
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