The Francis Preston Blair Family in Politics - Vol. 1

By William Ernest Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
THE POLICY OF THE Globe

"The World Is Governed Too Much."--BLAIR.


1

BLAIR began his battle for Jackson with the first issue of the Globe. "It will support the administration--and, as it is said, be opposed to the Telegraph," announced Niles' Register. "It is the purpose of the Editor to dedicate this paper to the discussion and maintenance of the principles which brought General Jackson into office, and which he brought with him into office," wrote Blair in his prospectus. Secondly, "as a means of giving permanent effect to those principles, which are considered essential to the preservation, peace, and prosperity of the Union," he proposed to advocate the reëlection of the President.1

Four months of supporting Jackson gave Blair a personal reason for advocating Jackson's cause. The warm-hearted old hero of New Orleans completely won Blair's admiration and fidelity. When he bought a cow, he was an early morning visitor at the President's Mansion, where he left a little pail of milk for the President's family, and where he received inspiration and direction. Few men, indeed, had an opportunity to come into such close intimacy with Jackson. "You may rely on it," Blair wrote to Mrs. Gratz, "he is as true a patriot as ever breathed, and as much a democrat as your humble servant. Mr. Gratz [a Clay man] would call him a Jacobin." Then Blair confidentially told Mrs. Gratz that his prospects were brightening: "If Old Hickory lives I shall undoubtedly be a great man some day. He likes me vastly, and as I am a sinner and hope to be saved he values my opinion in some things, and those nearest to him, more than he

____________________
1
Telegraph, Dec. 11, 1830.

-68-

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