Gender on the Market: Moroccan Women and the Revoicing of Tradition

By Deborah A. Kapchan | Go to book overview

1. In the Place of the Market

Keep away from the crowded markets [and] you will escape all evil

-- Moroccan proverb 1

The woman's market is volatile He who enters beware! They'll show you a ton of profit And walk away with your capital

-- Sidi Abderaḥman al-Majdub

A lie is not a lie; it is only a formula, a substitute, a long way around, a polite manner of saying: None of your business.

-- Paul Bowles, The Spider's House (9)

When I first went to Beni Mellal in 1982 there were plenty of women in the marketplace. Apart from the vendors of wool, eggs, bread, and chickens, however, women were primarily buying rather than selling. The scene is different today. There are now so many women marketers in Beni Mellal that they have had to set up their goods outside the market walls. There is no room for them within. Women have also begun to hawk herbs in the ḥalqa, the performance section of the marketplace. Their role as herbalists and their elaborate oratory in the suq mark a feminine entry into what has historically been a male domain.

Marketplaces are very sensitive registers of the sociopolitical climate ( Claire Robertson, personal communication; see also Agnew 1986; Davis 1978; Robertson 1984; Troin 1975). They are increasingly being recognized as key sites for the redefinition of ethnic and gender identities ( Seligmann 1993). This is because the marketplace -- both in its local itinerant form and in its international guise -- is a forum for transition. Goods and values trade hands in the market and identities are negotiated. While the cultural and transnational movement facilitated by the market relies on an intensification of social license, the opening of social boundaries provides the conditions for the hybridization of social and expressive forms. The marketplace puts all rules of appropriate behavior into question.

-29-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gender on the Market: Moroccan Women and the Revoicing of Tradition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 334

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.