Gender on the Market: Moroccan Women and the Revoicing of Tradition

By Deborah A. Kapchan | Go to book overview

6. Women on the Market: The Subversive Bride

The increased earning power of women in the economic market is introducing fundamental changes in ritual life and the social values it expresses. The Moroccan bride negotiates between relations of reciprocity (between two families who are merging their destinies by mingling their bloods) and relations of commodity, expressed in the bride's ability to "make good" and goods in the material economy. Ritual, in representing an intensification of social relations and values, provides a potent example of social change. The bride may still be considered a gift between families, but her packaging has changed considerably; and the packaging affects the contents, just as the mirror image affects the self image (cf. Ossman 1994).


Imagining Tradition

"I'll tell you about the real Moroccan weddings," Fadela said one evening as we sat on sheepskins on the balcony of her fourth-floor apartment; our children played a few feet away. The main boulevard below was already thick with pedestrians and café-goers breathing the cooler air of dusk. We watched a wedding procession move slowly down the streets: a muledrawn cart laden with bags of flour and sugar, bottles of oil, blankets, clothes, a tethered ram. About forty men and women followed the cart, singing, clapping their hands, and hitting small drums. The sound of the ghaiṭa, a small double-reed instrument, sang out above the other noises.

"Not the: 'evolved'1 weddings of today," she continued, aware of my interest in ritual. "The [traditional] weddings are still enacted in the countryside but hardly ever in the cities any more. Though sometimes you find them in the cities among the very oldest inhabitants.

"Seven days before the wedding of the bride is ḥǝnnaed from head to toe. They cover her under a large piece of cloth, like a tent. Only her mother and sisters may see her. For seven days they put Ḥǝnna everywhere. It

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gender on the Market: Moroccan Women and the Revoicing of Tradition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 334

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.