The Francis Preston Blair Family in Politics - Vol. 1

By William Ernest Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
JACKSONIAN POLITICS

The nature of sovereign power is not to endure a rival-- TACITUS.


1

THE Globe reached the apogee of its influence during Jackson's second administration. The friends of the President felt confident of their power. President Jackson believed the majority of votes which was returned in his favor in the election of 1832 was a vindication of his course. Friends came closer together and closed their ranks to meet the enemy. The apparent and most dangerous foes of the administration were the Bank and the political coalition.

While still jubilant over the recent victory at the election, the Globe began its violent onslaughts against the Bank, Clay, Calhoun, and Adams. Blair feared and sincerely hated the Bank, detested Clay, abhorred Calhoun, and despised Adams. He poured vitriol upon each as freely as the sheets of his organ issued forth in its daily stream. He needed no aid. Bennett of the New York Globe, later of the New York Herald, besought Levi Woodbury to use his influence with Jackson to secure for him an associate editorship with Blair. "I should like such a position remarkably well," wrote Bennett. "It would suit my temper--my imagination --my tastes--my all----- I think I would add a good deal of reputation and patronage to the Globe."1 But Jackson and Blair preferred to keep the Globe to themselves.

The President and the editor conferred secretly on subjects of moment and policy. "After you left me last evening," runs a note to Blair; another states: "Your note was received & answer returned that you could get a message tonight if you would come

____________________
1
Blair MSS., J. G. Bennett to Levi Woodbury, Dec. 4, 1832.

-111-

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