The Francis Preston Blair Family in Politics - Vol. 1

By William Ernest Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XV
THE FALL OF THE Globe

As we had made our means by the support of the Democracy, we [ Blair and Rives] were willing to devote them to the cause.

-- BLAIR TO JACKSON.


1

THE election of 1840 proved to be an overwhelming defeat for Van Buren. "Little Van" was so much "a used up man" that the electoral vote stood 234 to 60 in favor of Harrison. The scorn which the Democratic party poured out on the Whigs had changed to fear, to anger, and then to distress, before the election had closed. The Globe had explained confidently that Harrison was a "man of straw, stuck on a pole, not to frighten, but to attract the Abolition birds of prey in the North" and to tickle the South, especially Virginia. Tyler was considered a mere catspaw to gather a few chestnuts for Federalism in the South. After the election the Globe greeted the victors with charges of stupendous frauds, of profiting by the influence of English capitalists, and of having a puppet who was to be governed by Webster and Clay.1

The presidential party which left Cincinnati for Washington was described as a parade which satisfied the vanity and stirred the ego of Harrison. The trip became a progress of speech-making, whether the President traveled on a splendid steamer fitted for the occasion or traveled in military array accompanied by music and firing of cannon. Abolitionists, friends of the Bank, and expectant job-hunters applauded the triumphant march. "How different this from the course of the real hero--the brave and magnanimous Jackson! He left the Hermitage without a speech making display --passed on quietly by the nearest route to Washington--and surprised the people" by presenting himself at Gadsby's as a private

____________________
1
Stanwood, History of the Presidency, I, 203-204; The Globe, Mar. 5, 1840, and Feb. 4, 9, Mar. 13, 1841.

-144-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Francis Preston Blair Family in Politics - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 518

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.