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America's First Hamlet
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Acknowledgments 7
  • Contents 9
  • Prologue: Legend and Man 11
  • Part One - 1791 and Earlier to 1813 17
  • [1] - East Hampton: Home of Forebears 19
  • [2] - Home and Family 26
  • [3] - Boston: Home and School 33
  • [4] - The Wonder Boy 43
  • [5] - The Boy Playwrigh 54
  • [6] - The Collegian 66
  • [7] - Master Payne, Actor 76
  • [8] - Young Roscius Tours America 88
  • [9] - Corlaer's Hook: Home Between The Acts 98
  • Part Two - 1813 to 1832 107
  • [1] - American Roscius in England 109
  • [2] - Emelia Von Harten 119
  • [3] - The Emerald Isle 131
  • [4] - The Home Folks and the War 135
  • [5] - Two Cities: Two Plays 139
  • [6] - One Man Versus Two Managers 151
  • [7] - The Tragedy of Brutus 159
  • [8] - Troubled Interlude 172
  • [9] - Summer at Sadler's Wells 177
  • [10] - Virginius, Another Tragedy 186
  • [11] - Prison Diary 190
  • [12] - The Song is Written 202
  • [13] - The Song is Sung 211
  • [14] - Collaborators 223
  • [15] - Genteel Triangle 238
  • [16] - Looking at London from Paris 257
  • [17] - London: Final Years 267
  • Part Three - 1832 to 1852 and Later 275
  • [1] - Benefits Remembered 277
  • [2] - Jam Jehan Nima 289
  • [3] - Indian Suite: Contrasting Movements 297
  • [4] - Home Theme, with Variations 311
  • [5] - Cherokees East and West 320
  • [6] - Entr'Acte: Washington and New York 330
  • [7] - Mission to Tunis 337
  • [8] - Matters Official and Unofficial 353
  • [9] - Inevitable Hour 365
  • [10] - Precious Dust 374
  • Notes 389
  • Appendix: Specimens of Payne's Writing 415
  • Bibliography 423
  • Index 433
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