8. EGBA

EGBA is, today, one of the largest of the yoruba kingdoms. It is of recent foundation for it is only a hundred and thirty years since the people of the many small Egba towns settled together at Abeokuta. During this period there has been a continual conflict between the chiefs of these towns, on the one hand anxious to retain their power and maintain a federal form of government, and the Alakes, the obas of the new kingdom on the other hand, who have tried to consolidate the authority of the central government.

The Egba kingdom is coterminous with the modern administrative unit of Egba Division. It stretches from Isheri only twelve miles from Lagos, to the River Omi in the north-east, a similar distance from Ibadan. To the south-east are the Ijebu Remo kingdoms of Shagamu, Iperu and Ishara; to the west lie the Egbado kingdoms and to the north the Ibarapa kingdoms of Eruwa and Igbo-ora. Two towns have a semiindependent status within the Egba kingdom: Otta is the capital of the Awori people, who were pushed southwards by the immigrant Egba, and Imala is an Egbado kingdom whose people did not abandon their town at the time of the Dahomey wars.

The boundary between the crystalline rocks of the basement complex and the sedimentary series runs from WNW. to ESE. approximately through Abeokuta. To the north-west of the capital the country is a peneplain, rising to over 600 feet above sea level, surfaced in many parts by a concretionary lateritic ironstone which gives the country an and appearance. Rivers cut deeply and in their valley bottoms is most of the forest of this area. East of Abeokuta, on the crystalline rocks, the country is undulating and well watered, the forest cover increasing eastwards towards the boundaries with Ibadan and Ijebu; in the nineteenth century, an extensive no-man's-land lay between these territories. Southwards the country falls towards the sea in a succession of escarpments. The Egba kingdom is bisected by the Ogun river. At Abeokuta it lies less than 100 feet above sea level; the west bank rises gently without any spectacular features, but its east bank is lined with a series of granite tors, the highest of which (north of the town) rises to over 550 feet. The most famous of these tors is, however, the Olumo rock, around which Abeokuta is built; the caves formed naturally by the tremendous over-hanging boulders have probably been inhabited for many centuries.

The population of Egba Division is 394,000, of whom 97.5 per cent are yoruba (including the Egba proper, the Owu, Awori and Egbado).

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Yoruba Land Law
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Maps x
  • Preface xi
  • Part One - Concepts 1
  • 1. Prologue 3
  • 2. Customary Law 13
  • 3. Yoruba Towns 30
  • 4. Some Legal Concepts 60
  • Part Two - Four Kingdoms 95
  • 5. Ondo 97
  • 6. Ijebu 136
  • 7. Ado Ekiti 185
  • 8. Egba 225
  • Part Three - Some General Problems 277
  • 9. Succession 279
  • 10. Land and Credit 308
  • 11. the Sale of Land 326
  • 12. Equity 338
  • 13. Local Government Councils and Land 354
  • Appendix - The Volume of Litigation in Customary Courts 362
  • Select Bibliograph 364
  • Index 368
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 378

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.