At Close Quarters: PT Boats in the United States Navy

By Robert J. Bulkley Jr. | Go to book overview

Postscript

Shortly after August 1945, when the construction of four experimental PT boats was authorized, work was begun on several completely new designs that incorporated lessons learned in World War II. In 1951 the Navy accepted these boats -- the first post-World War II PT's. All of the boats had aluminum hulls, were powered by four Packard engines of considerably higher horsepower ratings than those used in the older boats, and had speeds in excess of 40 knots. Beyond these characteristics, however, the boats showed considerable variation.

PT 809, the first of the new boats to be tested, was built by the Electric Boat Co. It had a riveted hull which through the use of airframe construction principles was notably lightweight. The overall length of the boat was 98 feet and the maximum beam was 26 feet.

PT 810 was a Bath Iron Works (Bath, Maine) boat whose hull was partly riveted and partly welded. It was a shorter and broader boat than the rest, with dimensions of 89 feet in overall length and 24 feet at the extreme beam.

PT 811 was built by John Trumpy & Sons, Annapolis, Md. An all-welded boat, it was 94 feet in length and 25 feet in its maximum beam.

The last of the experimental boats, and also the largest, was PT 812. This boat was built by the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and had an overall length of 105 feet and a maximum beam of only 21 feet. It had an all-welded hull with a shape designed to assure high speed in rough seas. However, its speed in calm water did not equal that of the other boats. The 812 was later equipped with gas turbines in lieu of its four Packard engines.

From 1954 to 1959, these boats operated as Motor Torpedo Squadron 1 under the Navy's Operational Development Force. They were thoroughly evaluated both from a tactical and material point of view.

As of 1962, the lessons learned from these boats, as well as their predecessors, continue to be of great value in the never-ending efforts of the Navy to maintain versatile and highly effective seagoing forces.

-448-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
At Close Quarters: PT Boats in the United States Navy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 574

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.