7
POWER AND AUTHORITY IN THE FAMILY 1

DONALD M. WOLFE

The purpose of this study is to investigate several possible sources of power in the husband-wife relationship and their effects on the family authority structure. This report is divided into four sections. The first offers a conceptual analysis of power and authority in general, and suggests ways in which these concepts may be used in the study of the family. The second presents a diagrammatic model by which to compare various family authority structures. The third section describes procedures employed in an empirical study of family authority structure. The fourth presents the results of that study.


THEORETICAL APPROACH

The theoretical orientation upon which this analysis is based is primarily the group dynamics enlargement upon the Lewinian conceptualization of social power (1, 6, 7), and the development of the concept "authority" by Dubin (2).

Definition 1:Power is the potential ability of one person, O, to induce forces on another person, P, toward (or against) movement or change in a given direction, within a given behavior region, at a given time.

In general, O and P may be either persons or groups, but here we shall be concerned only with persons, i.e., the husband and wife in the nuclear family. Implicit in this definition is that this potential -- power of O over P -- is made up of the maximum forces O can induce on P, over and above the maximum forces P can exert in resistance to O's inductions. In the family setting, the husband may be able to influence his wife with respect to caring

____________________
1
The data for this study were provided by the Detroit Area Study survey of 1954- 1955. The Detroit Area Study is an ongoing research program of the Department of Sociology and the Survey Research Center, University of Michigan. Grateful acknowledgment is given to its director, Dr. Harry P. Sharp, for making the data available and for facilitating its analysis. The author also wishes to express his appreciation to Drs. Dorwin Cartwright, Alvin Zander, and Robert O. Blood for their helpful suggestions and criticisms and for editorial assistance.

-99-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in Social Power
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 225

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.