Argentina in the Twentieth Century

By David Rock | Go to book overview

4
Plantations and Peasants in Northern Argentina: the Sugar Cane Industry of Salta and Jujuy, 1930-1943

IAN RUTLEDGE


The expansion of the sugar cane industry in the provinces of Salta and Jujuy

The sugar cane industry of Argentina underwent its great period of growth in the late nineteenth century, but because of adverse climatic conditions, Argentina remained a marginal zone from the point of view of world sugar production and the industry could only prosper as a protected, import-substituting sector serving the internal market. However, the political power achieved by the provincial oligarchies of north-west Argentina (see Map 4.1) in the 1870s and 1880s enabled them to exert pressure on the National Government and obtain a high tariff barrier which practically cut off the external supply completely. Behind this tariff wall the provincial oligarchies of Tucumán, Jujuy and Salta were able to expand their new source of revenue up to the point that, by the turn of the century, the sugar industry was one of the most important in the country.1

It was in the small but heavily populated province of Tucumán that the industry enjoyed its major development in the late nineteenth century. The railway, which was the key factor making possible the industry's expansion, reached Tucumán in 1876, but did not extend as far north as Salta and Jujuy until 1890. In 1894, Salta had only one sugar ingenio2 and Jujuy three, whereas there were thirty-six in Tucumán.3

____________________
1
According to the 1914 census, there were 44 ingenios y refinerías in the country, with an average factory size (in terms of labour employed) which was second only to that of the frigorfficos (meat-packing plants).
2
Ingenio means sugar factory, but it will be used here to refer to the joint factory-plantation complex.
3
Emilio Schleh, Noticias históricas sobre el azúcar en la Argentina, Buenos Aires, 1945, p. 258.

-88-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Argentina in the Twentieth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.