International Arbitration, from Athens to Locarno

By Jackson H. Ralston | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXX
WORKINGS OF THE PERMANENT COURT OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE

253. Inception of the Court. -- We have followed the development of the theory of international tribunals to the last great step which has been taken so far in the world. In another portion of this work we describe the history of international tribunals to their present state of development. In the consideration of the theory we have found it necessary to anticipate at many points the principles of the Permanent Court of International Justice. It now becomes necessary to give a more complete exposition of its workings.

The controlling law relating to the formation and operation of the Court is contained in its Statute, formed pursuant to Article 14 of the Covenant of the League of Nations, which forms a protocol signed separately by the nations adhering to it. It is, therefore, not a part of the League of Nations, although functioning as a judicial body parallel with the League, and although its expenses are provided for by the League. It has authority to render advisory opinions, as we shall see, at the request of the Council or Assembly of the League. It was for reasons above indicated that not the League but representatives of the nations signing the protocol for its establishment determined whether and how far it was possible to accept the signature of the United States to the Protocol.

254. Selection of judges. -- The first point to arrest our attention is the matter of the selection of the judges. Having already given sufficient attention to the history by which the result was reached, we find by the Statute that it was not the intention of its framers to displace the Conventions of The Hague of 1899 and 1907 or to render unnecessary special tribunals of arbitration, "to which states are always at liberty to submit their disputes for settlement," but to create

a body of independent judges, elected regardless of their nationality from among persons of high moral character, who possess the qualifications required in their respective countries for appointment to the highest judicial office, or are jurisconsults of recognized competence in international law.

The qualifications mentioned are varied in the different countries, and, as we shall see, however nominated, the final say as to their qualifications rests with the Council and Assembly of the League. Certain precautions, however, which have only the strength of recom

-309-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Arbitration, from Athens to Locarno
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 417

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.