The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky; Jay Leyda et al. | Go to book overview

Thursday positively. My brother4 sends you his profoundest respects . . .

Yours, MODESTE MUSORSKY


3. To MILI BALAKIREV

[Postmarked: 7 January, 1858]

MOST EXCELLENT MILI ALEXEYEVICH,

For God's sake bring him,5 I shall be very glad to become friends with him, the more so as those works which I heard from you come quite close to my heart.--By all means bring him.

Yours, MODESTE MUSORSKY

P.S. Excuse this incoherent scribble, my head is whirling, I've just come from the review at the palace.6


4. To MILI BALAKIREV

[Postmarked: 24 January, 1858]

MOST EXCELLENT MILI ALEXEYEVICH,

You can't imagine how disappointed I am that our music lesson could not be arranged for tonight. This is how it happened: we received your note long after you had left it, for by seven o'clock this evening my brother and I had gone off to the opera.7--I am terribly disappointed and ashamed, particularly since it is so far from your

____________________
4
Philarète Petrovich Musorgsky, three years older than Modeste Petrovich. He is referred to in Modeste's letters by various nicknames: Kito, Kitosha, Kitinka. The two sons were now living with their widowed mother: their father, Piotr Alexeyevich, had died in 1853.
5
Another addition to the Balakirev Circle, Apollon Seliverstovich Gussakovsky, who will be referred to in the correspondence variously as Gusak, Gusachok, Gusinke, Gusikovsky.
6
A lengthy annual ceremony on Twelfth Night attended by the sovereign and court in which the water of the Neva is blessed by the metropolitan. Musorgsky's regiment, the Preobrazhensky Guards, being the most traditional of all Russian military units, played an important role in the military ceremony which followed. Further references to military duties in the following letter indicate a dissatisfaction with the complicated double life of a soldier-composer, a dissatisfaction that soon required a decisive conclusion. The charming uniformed pianist had already receded into the past.
7
The opera performed that night was Auber Fra Diavolo.

-5-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 478

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.