The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky; Jay Leyda et al. | Go to book overview

factorily, and a Kinderscherz,"53 which was heartily liked by Gussa. kovsky. These are my humble labors.--Mili, you would be delighted at the change that has taken place in me and, without doubt, it is powerfully reflected in my music. My brain has become stronger and has turned toward realities, the fires of youth have cooled off, everything has evened off, and of mysticism at the present time there isn't even half-a-word. My last mystic thing is this andante in B-flat minor (a chorus) from the introduction to Œdipus. I have completely recovered, Mili, thank God.--However, enough about myself, we shall see each other, God willing, and talk over everything. I've heard from maman that you have collected quite a lot of Russian songs;54 this is pleasant news, Mili; Stasov said that some of them are very good.--I hope to receive some word from you, Mili; I am now in Peter, you know my address; Gussakovsky is producing very fine things, some of them he played for me, and he is now orchestrating his symphonic allegro.--By the way, Mili. The Zakharins have suggested that he move in with them; he has asked me about this and has asked me to decide. Not knowing exactly the manner of thinking and the attitude of Avd[otya] Petr[ovna Zakharina], I told him only one thing: though I have nothing to suggest in this respect, I have inwardly wished that he would adopt a more quiet way of living.--It seems he wrote to you in reference to this; you know the Zakharins well and you have probably satisfied Gussakovsky with a more definite answer. Please write to me, Mili. My brother kisses you warmly. Maman sends you her respects and wishes you much, much good.--Now I'm putting all my little musical sins in order. For a new period of my musical life has begun.--Till we meet, dear Mili, I kiss you warmly.

MODESTE


18. To MILI BALAKIREV

9 November [1860]

I inform you, dear Mili, of a completely pleasant situation for me (and possibly for you, too). I was at D. Stasov's today--to get tickets for the Shilovskys. With regard to my chorus [from Œdipus], the

____________________
53
This is the second version, dated May 28, 1860, the manuscript of which is now in the Library of Congress in Washington.
54
On his trip down the Volga this summer, Balakirev recorded a number of folk songs, for the purpose of issuing a collection (published in 1866).

-26-

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