The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

II
Exploration 1863 - 1868

30. TO MILI BALAKREV, Pyatigorsk

Toropetz, 10 June [1863]

GREETINGS, MILI,

I share with you my impressions of Serov's opera.1 All five acts are herewith properly laid out and justly appraised. It would seem that such a big thing would require more than two hearings; it is difficult to judge an opera's quality from first impressions; anyway this Wagner's Kindchen during its whole five-act life does not offer one place that deeply touches one, nor one scenic episode that makes one think deeply.

Besides, the libretto is extremely bad, the declamation is pitiful and un-Russian; only the orchestration is interesting in spots, although often too intricate. However, Judith is the first seriously worked-out opera on the Russian stage since Rusalka.--As all things must begin at the beginning, we have:


The Overture

Espèce de Vorspiel, without interest, chaotic, but with intentions which however are not realized--suspected intentions. A somber largo (the Jews), led astray by sudden wild blasts from the trombones (probably Holofernes); and after it, agitato, a harp (Judith); husky Judith was unthinkable for Serov without a harp, even though the personal-

____________________
1
Alexander Serov, long in search of a suitable opera subject, had been struck by the effectiveness of a third-rate Italian melodrama, Giuditta, by Giacometti, in the visiting Italian theater's repertoire in St. Petersburg. Using this as a springboard, he wrote his own libretto with the help of the poet Apollon Maikov and his first opera, Judith, was under way. Musorgsky's "impressions" are not too violent for a twenty-four-year-old enthusiast who is dreaming of writing an opera himself.

-48-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 478

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.