The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

transparently with harps and flageolets; the strings will not be muted all the time, but only once when they go to F. Alternating the bass from A to G-sharp in the gamma, as I've already told you, I change to D-flat major, and (at the very beginning with simple chords of harps in a low register) the trepak begins in D-flat major. I have everything composed till here, but it remains to be written, and all the details of this will become clear. The further plan is known to you: storm and at the very climax the church theme. How about this one which came to mind just recently? [musical quotation]

Pay no attention to the tonality.

I don't know, dearest, how much I could clarify to you what is being composed and what is being proposed; in any case I want to receive a reply from you. Of course, you can't judge these severely, as you know Sadko only in its previous fragments; I knew this when I wrote you, but nevertheless I wanted to share at least something with you. Now I am quite alone in Peter and I can tune myself to Sadko only by bathing in the Neva, which, by the way, I do, but of course not with this aim.

Till we meet, write.

N. RIMSKY-KORSAKOV

Thank you again for the letter and the good news of the completion of St. John's Night, which I terribly want to see with you. Rest a little and compose something else pretty.


47. To NIKOLAI RIMSKY-KORSAKOV, St. Petersburg

Minkino Farm 15 July [1867]

I anticipated your friendly wish, dear Korsinka. The orchestration is ready for the Intermezzo (in B minor, which was the little piano piece, without a middle) the middle is done in E major in the character of the trio from the scherzo of the 9th Symphony [Beethoven]; of course with the violins pizzicato in an easy, jovial sort of instrumentation.--I admit that the contrast with the B-minor part is rather sharp, but nevertheless it must refresh the impression, because the B-minor part is again repeated.--Throughout the B-minor part the rhythmic strokes

-93-

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