The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

you. But my opinion is that nothing good can come out of wreckage and rearrangement . . .


77. To VLADIMIR STASOV

[ December 14, 1871]

My dear, I fully share your thought not to mignonize,84 and so I am writing the last chord of the fountain scene: Till Friday. I firmly kiss you.

MUSORYANIN

A Composite Painting

. . . In the winter of 1871-72, on the commission of A. A. Poro-
khovshchikov, constructor of the "Slavonic Bazaar," I painted a pic-
ture of the group of Slavonic composers: Russian, Polish, Czech.
Stasov took part in the development of this theme. He insisted on the
necessity of including among the number there the figures of Mu-
sorgsky and Borodin. An inquiry, addressed to Porokhovshchikov,
resulted in this reply: "There you are, you're going to sweep all sorts
of trash [musor] into that painting! My list of names was provided
by Nikolai Rubinstein himself, and I don't dare to add to it or take
anyone off that list that was given to you . . . I am sorry about one
thing, that he didn't write in Tchaikovsky . . ."--ILYA REPIN


78. To ALEXANDRA PURGOLD

3 January, 1872 [Monday]

Many thanks, Alexandra Nikolayevna, for the information concerning Saturday and I heartily beseech you to arrange for Boris on Saturday, as long as there are no hindrances of any kind for Vladimir Fyodorovich [Purgold] and those acquaintances of his who wished to hear my little sins. I'm quite familiar with the Gogol subject [Fair at Sorochintzi?], I thought about it two years ago, but the matter does not fit into the path chosen by me--it doesn't embrace Mother Russia in all her simple-souled girth. I'll inform Kvey, but I haven't yet informed him: I'm coming earlier tomorrow, for around 10 I have to

____________________
84
This remark has borne some weighty interpretations, but the fact is that Stasov and Musorgsky were merely unable to attend a performance of Mignon that night.

-176-

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