The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky; Jay Leyda et al. | Go to book overview

92. To VLADIMIR STASOV

Généralissime, Friday 29 September, '72

Nothing is happening at the Purgolds tomorrow in regard to music, because it is impossible for Nadezhda N. Rimskaya.19 You need not doubt that your little letter of yesterday had an effect, any more than you may doubt that I am rereading the travels in the Holy Land of the priest Lukyanov. The perusal of this will be the subject of an epistle to you in the swiftly flowing stream of time. I report to you, that this observant old-believer fellow of a priest is quite appetizing; one can find something about the Little-Russians, about the Turks and many other good things here. A scroll is being prepared for notes on important points, in order to embellish our Khovanshchina. Lukyanov's travels are almost exactly contemporary with the operatic life of Khovanshchina and in any case are stuffed with the most characteristic material. Altogether--you always hit the mark truly--remember your running comment yesterday to an accompaniment of Petya's20 interjections. Well, Boris is beyond him. Yes, and "The Nursery" was requested by him only because Balakirev had praised it.

MUSORYANIN

When a gathering can be arranged at the Purgolds--we'll let each other know.

Entertainment at the Repins'

[At my request] V. V. Stasov agreed to stand as godfather to my daughter Vera [born October 6, 1872] and V. V. came along with M. P. Musorgsky. Both great musician and great historian stayed with us little people till late evening. M. P. entertained us, playing great Mozart on a poor piano. He improvised a lot [and played] "The Seminarist" and other things. He remembered many beggars chor-

____________________
19
On June 30 Nadezhda Purgold had married Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov in the church of Shuvalovo--with Musorgsky as best man. Her sister Alexandra, whom Nadezhda had thought of marrying to Musorgsky, did not hesitate long after her sister's wedding--marrying in November of the same year a government official and amateur landscape painter by the name of Nikolai Molas. Musorgsky was best man at this wedding too.
20
"Petya" is Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, whose immediate reason for a trip to St. Petersburg was the submission of his new opera Oprichnik to the Imperial Theater Directorate. Could "Petya's" negative response to Boris be partially explained by his having composed a scene from Pushkin Boris (in 1864-65?)--the fountain scene between Maryna and Dmitri?

-197-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 478

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.