The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky; Jay Leyda et al. | Go to book overview

quaintance succeeds. In my opinion--these should be printed: "The Little Room," "Elegy," "Longing," "By the River" (from our album [ Sunless]); and then let us discuss those of your tales so negligently and easily strewn through the pages of your innumerable notebooks, aimlessly and without reason, just because of the laziness and heedlessness of these tales (Dixi!).

Well, I send a greeting to you with a free heart, beloved Arseni mine, and long life to your glory!--It's been begun, there is no longer any turning aside, nor any subterfuge; now for great, restless work-- God give you strength!

MODESTE MUSORGSKY

Enclosing in this letter to you one from someone with my name, evidently proud of the rank of Aulic Councilor. The letter is not too stupid although its form is horrible--"simply stinking of ink." You need not answer him, the more so as the Aulic Councilor did not indicate his address.26

MODESTE MUSORGSKY

Summer Laughter

. . . I remember the hot summer of 1875, when my mother went off for a while to visit a friend in Revel, and we were left behind with Father--Musorgsky and [Uncle] Vladimir Vasilyevich [ Stasov], visited us especially often that summer, and they had the idea of rereading all of Gogol; after lunch, in the terrible heat, we all would gather in the study, seat ourselves on the sofa, and, taking turns, father, Vlad. Vas. and Musorgsky read aloud May Night, The Carriage, The Nose and Dead Souls, while we all nearly expired with laughter . . . --

VARVARA STASOVA-KOMAROVA


150. To VLADIMIR STASOV, Paris27

Petrograd. Vas[ilyevsky] Ostrov, 5th line, opposite the garden of the Acad[emy] of Arts, No. 10 7 August, '75

In place of an epigraph:
"The first act of our
Khovanshchina is finished."

____________________
26
This is a Musorgskian joke, relating to Letter 148.
27
Stasov had been sent to Paris by the Public Library to attend the Geographic Congress.

-300-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 478

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.