The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Jay Leyda; Sergei Bertensson et al. | Go to book overview

drama is more integral and is easier in the listening, and if these flights are described, then, I dare say, one becomes verbose. Consequently, I believe, you will hear first and then we shall talk it over. Do me the kindness, Your Highness, not to forget and push aside your artistic matters. Of course, to kill a defenseless and absolutely harmless snipe --is commendable, because the snipe is a tasty bird, but why not leave the accomplishment of these great deeds to people dealing in and living on killed snipe, not eating said bird at the same time.

I like very much being at Naumov's, especially in the summer: the garden, the broad street, the near-by Neva. Visitors: Kolyush [ Nikolai Konstantinovich] Larin, Zhemchuzhnikov ( Kuzma Prutkov); good talks; occasional music; all sorts of news, chatter and rechatter--one lives, breathes and works. I await you as long as my strength holds out and I wait with a key, and meanwhile, I kiss you warmly.

Your

MODESTE MUSORGSKY

Naumov sends greetings, Larin and Voyeikov also. [Platon] Pavlov has left for Kiev. Vl[adimir] Stasov is expected from Paris at the end of August.


151a. ANDREI KATENIN to ARSENI GOLENISHCHEV-KUTUZOV, Altynova [Extract]

S.-Petersburg. 4 September, 1875

You can't imagine, dear friend Arseni, how much your letter has astonished and alarmed me with its news about your wrenched foot. There, I was right, you should have come with us to Peter and let the woodcocks be shot (as Musorgsky says) by those who deal in them. And too, I was very sorry that the pain prevented you from writing me in detail about your illness, about how you are passing the time at Altynova and whether you are working.--I've long meant to write you, but wanted to have something interesting to tell you, but encountered no one in that time.

Stasov hasn't arrived yet, but I managed to grab Musorgsky only the day before yesterday, he dined at our place and stayed all evening. I'd like to write you in detail about what we did that evening, but if it's boring for you to read--then skip this. After dinner I showed him my things: firstly, a song which you don't know, a pendant to the one I wrote in Yakovlevo, which he sufficiently approved, then a sec-

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