The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky; Jay Leyda et al. | Go to book overview

blazing with musical work: for he has further acquired a little chorus of girls for Sorochintzi, and in Khovanshchina it has become apparent how all should be in the scene of the scribe's story to the streltzi about the troopers. Well and good! Yesterday I dined and spent the evening at the Généralissime's, Repin was there and we were glad to see each other. It was delightful. Yes, I nearly forgot, I have invented something extremely physiognomical for the pastor in Khovanshchina.17 Really! Till our meeting in the very near future, my dear little dove; be well, and your Musinka greets you heartily; on Wednesday it shall be done as you have deigned to command.

Your MUSINKA

24 July, 1876


180a. VLADIMIR STASOV to DIMITRI STASOV [Extract]

July 31, 1876

. . . Last Friday I invited Musorgsky over with Repin, and the latter was in great ecstasy over all that Musorgsky had composed in the 3 years that he [ Repin] had been away. Yes, I give you my word, all this time Musorgsky has gone ahead in my esteem so enormously that mere "Musicians"--Rimsky-Korsakov, Cui and the like--simply cannot see or understand this situation . . .


181. To LUDMILA SHESTAKOVA

Tzarskoye Selo, New Places Zhukovsky's dacha, No. 7 2 August, 1876

Dear little dove of mine, Ludmila Ivanovna, you see I have moved. The dacha is so excellent that the trees creep into the window and whisper, what exactly--I don't know, but they seem to be whispering something nice. With these good and peaceful friends, although they are a little noisy at times, God help us accomplish our strong desires, to achieve "those" deeds--of which one only dreams. Possessed of a strong body and, if God so grants, peace of mind, perhaps Khovanshchina will not reject me. Last night I hardly slept in the "new place";

____________________
17
A satirical scene in Act II: the German pastor comes to Prince Golitzin requesting permission to build a second church in the German quarter of Moscow.

-341-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 478

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.