The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky; Jay Leyda et al. | Go to book overview

me; the same thing happened at Kherson in the Boshnyak family, with the same effect, the same raptures. O Laroche! O Solovyov! O Laroche and Solovyov and Ivanov, along with Haller!13 On the steamer from Odessa to Sevastopol, near the Tarkhankhut lighthouse (where the [imperial] yacht Livadia was wrecked), when most of the passengers had begun to be seasick, I wrote down Greek and Jewish songs, as sung by some women, and I sang the latter with them myself, and they were very pleased and among themselves they referred to me as Meister.--By the way, in Odessa, I went to holy services at two synagogues, and was in raptures. I have clearly remembered two Israelite themes: one sung by the cantor, the other by the temple choir--the latter in unison; I shall never forget these!

Now along the Don and the Volga towards home.

There you have, my dear généralissime, my little narrative. I heartily embrace you and congratulate you along with your splendid family on the family's holiday on September 17. I bow to all the nice Stasovs and send them my cordial greeting. Please embrace my dear Alexander Vasilyevich Meyer for me. And please give this little note (enclosed herewith) to the little dove Nadezhda Vasilyevna.

Your

MUSORYANIN

If you wish, my dear, to make me, like a fine elastic substance, leap with joy to the very ceiling, do write me at Samara in care of general delivery. Well, dearest, do this, to make your Musoryanin happy.


207. To NADEZHDA STASOVA, St. Petersburg

DEAR LITTLE DOVE,

NADEZHDA VASILYEVNA,

On your holiday, September 17, allow yourself the thought that your devoted Musoryanin is bringing you in person his soul's congratulation and is present in the midst of your dearest family, ever so affable and affectionate to Musoryanin and, though I know not why, loving Musoryanin. And I, like cheese melting in butter, am luxuriating in Yalta under the patronage of the enchantress Sofia Vladimirovna and her enchanting husband Mikhail Antonovich. What air, what surroundings, what sea, what marvelous walks in the vicinity! How is it,

____________________
13
Critics who wrote ill of The Nursery.

-394-

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