The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky; Jay Leyda et al. | Go to book overview

ness. You know my motto: "Dare! Forward to new shores!"--it has remained unchanged. If fate allows me to widen the beaten path toward the vital aims of art, I shall rejoice and exult; the demands that art makes upon modern workers are so huge that they are capable of swallowing up the whole man. The time has passed for writing at leisure; one must give one's whole self to the people--that's what is now needed in art.--Once more thanks to you.

Your MUSORYANIN

16 January 1880


211a. VLADIMIR STASOV to MILI BALAKIREV [Extract]

February 17, 1880

Mili, it appears that some other people are helping Musorgsky at the rate of 80 rubles a month on the sole condition that he finish his opera Fair at Sorochintzi within a year or thereabouts. That is why he resists so sedulously the writing of Khovanshchina now . . .


212. To NIKOLAI BERNARD

HIGHLY ESTEEMED

NIKOLAI MATVEYEVICH

I beg you to rush the publication of the excerpts from my opera Fair at Sorochintzi; this will greatly oblige me.

Tomorrow I shall be at your place. Hearty greetings to your good family.

Devoted to you, M. MUSORGSKY

May 1, 1880

Bonfire

. . . Musorgsky spent the last summer before his death at the [Bobrovo] estate of my aunt, the Princess Anna Vasilyevna Shakhovskaya, née Golenishcheva-Kutuzova, in the Province of Pskov. On leaving, he left a heap of papers and music manuscripts in his rooms. The next year, during the repairs of the house and the sum-

____________________
Stasov, Filippov and others (including Alexei Zhemchuzhnikov and a certain Neronov) decided on a surer method, to pool their finances and pay Musorgsky one hundred rubles a month on the condition that he was to finish Khovanshchina. This may be Musorgsky's reply to Stasov's notification of the pension.

-402-

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