The Musorgsky Reader: A Life of Modeste Petrovich Musorgsky in Letters and Documents

By Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky; Jay Leyda et al. | Go to book overview

and the development of a good technique and a clean leading subject. All of us, that is, myself and Borodin, and Balakirev, and Blaramberg,30 but especially Cui and Musorgsky, neglected this. I consider that I caught myself in time and made myself get down to work. Owing to such deficiencies in technique Balakirev writes little, Borodin--with difficulty, Cui--sloppily, and Musorgsky-messily and often nonsensically; Blaramberg suffers from all these deficiencies to a greater or lesser degree, and all this constitutes the very regrettable specialty of the Russian school . . .


216. To IVAN GORBUNOV

[a musical greeting card]

In memory of the 16th of November, 1880--- jubilee of the 25th anniversary of the people's Russian artist Ivan Fyodorovich Gorbunov, written for him by one who is deeply devoted to him, so dear to the Russian people

MODESTE MUSORGSKY


217. To NIKOLAI RIMSKY-KORSAKOV

[ December 1880]

MY DEAR NIKOLAI ANDREYEVICH,

With all my soul I trust you to take away from the Conservatory of the Imperial Russian Musical Society my score of the march ( The Capture of Kars) with the orchestral parts.31

Your soul's

M. MUSORGSKY

____________________
30
P. I. Blaramberg had frequented the Balakirev Circle in the past. He was now an instructor at Shostakovsky's music school.
31
This is the former March of the Princes from the ruins of Mlada, refurbished with a new trio and submitted as The Capture of Kars for another unrealized project--a series of allegorical tableaux vivants in honor of the twenty-fifth anniversary of Alexander II's reign. Other products of this plan were Borodin On the Steppes of Central Asia and Rimsky-Korsakov's Slava. All these found their way to the public ear, however, Kars being conducted by Napravnik at the second concert in the season of the Imperial Russian Musical Society, on October 18. This is Musorgsky's last extant letter.

-407-

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