Men and Movements in American Philosophy

By Arthur E. Murphy | Go to book overview

INDEX
A
Abbot, Francis Ellingwood, 159, 165, 175-186,218, 232, 322

"The Conditioned and the Unconditioned, " 176

"The Philosophy of Space and Time," 176

The Syllogistic Philosophy, 179

Abduction, 251
Abolition, 85
Abolitionism, 120
Abolitionists, 137
Absolute, Hegelian, 191
Absolute Being, 215
Absolute Experience, 214
Absolute Idea, 214
Absolute Idealism, 199
Absolute Mind, 212
Absolute moral person, 210
Absolute Person, 207, 215
Absolute Self, 213
Absolute Truth, 212
Absolute Will, 211
Absolutism, Royce's, 260
Acquired characteristics, inheritance of, 152
Act:

Mead's theory of, 266

stages of, 266

universality of, 268

"Act Establishing Religious Freedom," 46, 54-55
Action, mental, 287
Active powers, in matter, 29
Activity, in education, 237
Adam, federal head of human race, 22
Adams, Jasper, The Elements of Moral Philosophy, 86
Adams, John, 42, 43, 44, 45, 56, 72, 75

Defense of the Constitutions of Government of the United States, 75

Adams, John (cont.)

Discourses on Davila, 75

Letters to John Taylor of Caroline, 75

Adams, Samuel, 43
Adjustment, 253
Adler, Felix, 193, 194
Affections, gracious, 230
Agassiz, Louis, 167
Agency:

material, 31, 32

spiritual, 31, 32

Agnosticism, 182
"Agrarian justice," Paine's view of, 61-63
Agrarianism, 54, 61
Agreeable leadings, 255
Aitkin, Robert, 56
Alcott, A. Bronson, 120, 131, 132, 142, 164, 190
Alcott, Louisa May, 120
American life, spiritual interpretation of, 150
American Philosophical Association, 218, 219, 225, 226, 335
American Philosophic Society, 46
Ames, Fisher, 75, 76

"On the Dangers of American Liberty," 76

Analogy:

science of, 90

the science of sciences, 91

Anarchism, in Thoreau, 134, 137, 141
Andover Theological Seminary, 83
Appearance, reality and, 112, 316
Aristocracy, 60

natural vs. hereditary, 53

Aristotle, 184, 191, 322, 323, 328, 336
Associationism, 105
Authoritarianism, foe of rationalism, 337

-385-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Men and Movements in American Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Men and Movements in American Philosophy *
  • Foreword v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Prelude 1
  • 1: Colonial Materialism and Immaterialism 9
  • 2: The American Enlightenment 36
  • 3: Philosophical Orthodoxy 73
  • 4: New England's Wild Oats 110
  • 5: The Biologizing of Philosophy 151
  • 6: Varieties of Idealism 187
  • 7: Pragmatic Perspectives 228
  • 8: Cross Currents of Realism 274
  • 9: The Emergence of Naturalism 313
  • Footnotes and Suggested Reading 357
  • Index 385
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 403

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.