Feudal Britain: The Completion of the Medieval Kingdoms, 1066-1314

By G. W. S. Barrow | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX
DAVID I, 1124-53

ALEXANDER I left no children, and in 1124 the only surviving legitimate descendant of Malcolm Canmore was his youngest son, David, then a man of about forty. Ailred of Rievaulx, who afterwards knew David well, says that his distaste for power was so great that the bishops could barely persuade him to go through the ancient ceremony of enthronement. Since David had already been ten years Earl of Huntingdon and lord of Cumbria, his reluctance may have been due rather to a feeling that the ceremony at Scone was alien and (compared with the English coronation) unchristian. If so, it was a symbolic beginning to his reign. For the Scotland of his time was ready to enter fully into the main stream of European development, and in so doing to sacrifice something of her own heritage of custom and culture. The tide of new ideas and institutions had turned to the flood and could not be stemmed at every point or for a much longer time. The substitution for Celtic tribal custom of the feudal custom of Neustria, including especially the harsh but politically valuable rule of primogeniture; the first glimpses of the tremendous edifice of Roman law which the schools of northern Italy were unfolding; an exalted notion of kingship and advances towards centralised royal administration; the use of towns and coined money, with a resultant enlargement of trade; the integration of a local Church within a European ecclesiastical framework, and the gradual transformation of Rome from a pilgrims' shrine into the seat of government for the whole Church of the west -- these were some of the experiences and experiments in which twelfth-century Scotland was ready to share. It was her great good fortune to find in David I a man exceptionally sensitive and receptive to these changes in the contemporary world and a king who could hold the balance between the foreign institutions which he introduced and the deep-rooted traditions and customs of his native country.

Between 1093 and 1107 most of David's time was spent at the courts of Rufus and Henry I. Henry took a liking to him, gave

-134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Feudal Britain: The Completion of the Medieval Kingdoms, 1066-1314
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 452

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.