Social Studies for the Twenty-First Century: Methods and Materials for Teaching in Middle and Secondary Schools

By Jack Zevin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 11
Teaching U.S. Government and Civics

It is to be remembered, that if Princes have Law and Authority on their sides, the People on theirs may have Nature, which is a formidable Adversary; Duty, Justice, Religion, nay, even Humane Prudence too, biddeth the People suffer any thing rather than resist; but uncorrected Nature, where e're it feels the smart will run to the nearest Remedy. Mens Passions in this Case are to be consider'd as well as their Duty, let it be never so strongly enforc'd, for if their Passions are provok'd, they being as much a part of us as our Limbs, they Lead Men into a short way of Arguing, that admitteth no distinction, and from the foundation of Self-Defence they will draw Inferences that will have miserable effects upon the quiet of a Government. Our Trimmer therefore dreads a general discontent, because he thinketh it differeth from a Rebellion, only as a Spotted Fever doth from the Plague, the same Species under a lower degree of Malignity; it worketh several ways; sometimes like a slow Poyson that hath its Effects at a great distance from the time it was given, sometimes like dry Flax prepared to catch at the first Fire, or like Seed in the ground ready to sprout upon the first Shower; in every shape tis fatal, and our Trimmer thinketh no pains or precaution can be so great as to prevent it. In short he thinketh himself in the right, grounding his Opinion upon that Truth, which equally hateth to be under the Oppressions of wrangling Sophistry of the one hand, or the short dictates of mistaken Authority on the other. Our Trimmer adoreth the Goddess Truth, tho' in all Ages she hath been scurvily used, as well as those that Worshipped her; tis of late become such a ruining Virtue, that Mankind seemeth to be agreed to commend and avoid it; yet the want of Practice which Repealeth the other Laws, hath no influence upon the Law of Truth, because it hath root in Heaven, and an Intrinsick value in it self, that can never be impaired; she sheweth her Greatness in this, that he Enemies even when they are successful are ashamd to own it; nothing but powerful Truth hath the preprogative of Triumphing, not only after Victories, but in spite of them, and to put Conquest her self out of Countenance; she may be kept under and supprest, but her Dignity still remaineth with her, even when she is in Chains....

-- Walter Raleigh, ed., The Complete Works of George Savile, First Marquess of Halifax


OVERVIEW OF CONTENTS
Main Ideas
Setting Goals
Didactic Goals
Reflective Goals
Affective Goals
Designing the Program
The Operational Approach

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