Social Studies for the Twenty-First Century: Methods and Materials for Teaching in Middle and Secondary Schools

By Jack Zevin | Go to book overview

Appendix A

RESOURCES FOR INSTRUCTION
Nota Bene: One of my students, enrolled in the student teaching program,
once complained that he could not find any ideas for his social studies lessons.
I responded in amazement that, if anything, there were so many resources
available that it was easy to be overwhelmed! So, the following is a list of orga-
nizations, publishers, distributors, agencies, and groups who offer services,
publications, and memberships that can provide you with many different
kinds of materials and ideas for teaching almost any aspect of social studies.
Where possible, I have given addresses, phone numbers, Web/Internet sites
(beginning with www, but omitting http.//), and e-mail addresses (where
available) for each agency, organization, and association, which hopefully will
stay current well after this book is published. However, you should always do
a bit of checking on telephone numbers, Internet, and Web sites, so please feel
free to add your own addresses and "finds" to the list. Surely, I have missed a
few sources that are treasure troves of materials and ideas, so please feel free to
build up the list and let me know of any organizations that offer great free or
inexpensive materials.

American Anthropological Association 1703 New Hampshire Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20009 Professional organization of university anthropologists; publishes a journal and sometimes teacher-oriented materials on archeology and cultures.

American Association for State and Local History 530 Church Street, Suite 600 Nashville, TN 37219-2325 615-255-2971 e-mail:aasih@nashville.net" www.nashvifle.net/aaslh Aims to preserve and encourage the study of local history; publishes a newsletter and a journal, History News.

American Bar Association/YEFC 15.3 Special Committee on Youth Education for Citizenship Update on Law Related Education 541 North Fairbanks Court Chicago, IL 60611-3314 312-988-5735

-409-

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