The V-Chip Debate: Content Filtering from Television to the Internet

By Monroe E. Price | Go to book overview

prescriptive TV-PG14 standard that the show contained "material that many parents would find unsuitable for children under 14 years of age." By contrast, if the mostly descriptive Recreational Software Advisory Council rating system (reviewed above) had been applied to the Ellen episode in question, the kiss in question presumably would have received a "1" level nudity/sex rating,95 just as any heterosexual kiss would have (a kiss is still a kiss). It is ironic that during the debate over the creation of the TV rating system, many within the television industry argued inexplicably that descriptive ratings would have a greater potential chilling effect on the range of program content than age-based prescriptive ones, though the arguments and Ellen example above indicate that the reverse is true.

While media rating systems are increasingly being used in many countries as a vehicle for addressing concerns about violent and other potentially problematic media content, this choice is not without its costs. A society that values freedom of expression should be extremely cautious about assigning warning labels to ideas, regardless of whether those ideas come in the form of political rhetoric or fictional stories. While ratings are preferable to direct government legislation of media content, they are by no means an ideal social policy. The cost to freedom of expression involved in rating media content can be limited through the use of rating systems that maximize description and minimize judgment. Ratings that simply provide descriptive information can enable individual parents and other consumers to make media consumption choices based on their own values and tastes, an approach far superior to those rating systems that attempt to make judgments about which kinds of entertainment or information are "appropriate" for other people's consumption.


Notes
*
This chapter is a revised and updated excerpt from the author's book, Media Ratings: Design, Use and Consequences (Mediascope, 1996). The revision effort benefitted greatly from the cooperation of all the relevant film rating organizations, as well as from outstanding research assistance by Melissa York. The original book was commissioned and published by Mediascope, Inc., a Los Angeles-based nonprofit media policy organization. It was funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the California Wellness Foundation, and written while the author was Mediascope's Director of Research. For a copy of the full book, contact Mediascope at (818) 508-2080.
1
Report on Activities, 1991-92. Sydney: Office of Film and Literature Classification and Film and Literature Board of Review, 1993, p. 8.
3
Guidelines for the Classification of Films and Videotapes: Information Bulletin No. 7. Sydney: Australian Office of Film and Literature Classification, 1993.
4
Frank Marzic, Executive Officer, Australian Office of Film and Literature Classification. Telephone Communication, June 24, 1993.
5
Office of Film and Literature Classification, Guidelines for the Classification of Films and Videotapes, July 1996, pp. 7-15.
6
Censorship Markings for Cinema and Video Advertising. Sydney: Australian Office of Film and Literature Classification, 1993.
7
Office of Film and Literature Classification, Guidelines for the Classification of Computer Games, Sydney: Office of Film and Literature Classification, October 1997.
8
Attorney-General Australian National Government. Computer Games and Censorship Reforms Agreed. (Press Release) February 18, 1994.
9
Office of Film and Literature Classification, Printed Matter Classification Guidelines. Sydney: Office of Film and Literature Classification, 1992.

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The V-Chip Debate: Content Filtering from Television to the Internet
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 363

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.