Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite: The American Revolution & the European Response

By Charles W. Toth | Go to book overview

appeared. The American Revolution failed to become a stimulus to action for Germany mainly because the ideas it brought forth circulated only among a rather small group of intellectuals and because dissatisfaction with the princely regimes was as yet not strong enough to overcome the inertia of centuries of tradition. The ideas were there; their time had not quite come. 16


Notes
1.
A part of this literature had been reprinted. The major collections are: John A. Walz , "Three Swabian Journalists and the American Revolution", German- American Annals, New Series, I ( 1903), 257-275, 347-357, 406-420; Walz, "The American Revolution and German Literature", Modern Language Notes, XVI ( 1901), 336-351; James T. Hatfield and Elfrieda Hochbaum, "The Influence of the American Revolution upon German Literature"; America Germanica, III ( 1900), 338-385; Henry S. King, "Echoes of the American Revolution in German Literature", University of California Publications in Modern Philology, XTV ( 1929-1930), 23-193; Guy Stanton Ford, "Two German Publicists on the American Revolution", The Journal of English and Germanic Philology, VIII ( 1909), 145-176. Editor's note: See the recent study by Horst Dippel, Germany and the American Revolution ( Chapel Hill, 1977).
2.
A short but vivid account will be found in G. P. Gooch, Germany and the French Revoltuion ( London, 1920), chap. 1. Reprinted by F. Cass Publishers in 1965. More general treatments within the framework of modern European history are contained in: The New Cambridge Modern History, ed. J. O. Lindsay, vol. VII ( Cambridge, England, 1957); Leo Gershoy, From Despotism to Revolution, 1763-1789 ( New York, 1944); Philippe Sagnac, La fin de l'ancien régime et la révolution américaine, 1763- 1789 ( Paris, 1941).
3.
A concise summary of the subsidy treaties and an account of the organization of the German troops is contained in Bernard A. Uhlendorf, ed., Revolution in America: Confidential Letters and Journals . . . of . . . General . . . Bauermeister of the Hessian Forces ( New Brunswick, 1957), 1-29.
4.
Fritz Valjavec, Die Entstehung der politischen Strömungen in Deutschland, 1770-1815 ( Munich, 1951), 108-109.
5.
Quoted from the MS of a chapter on Europe and the American Revolution written by Professor Robert Palmer for the forthcoming volumes to be entitled Universalgeschichte, a new edition of Die neue Propylaen-Weltgeschichte ( Berlin, 1940- 1943), 5 volumes.
6.
George P. Gooch, Germany and the French Revolution, 27.
7.
Ludwig Salomon, Geschichte des deutschen Zeitungswesens ( Oldenburg and Leipzig, 1906), I, 204.
8.
Lyrical essays on Franklin and Washington provided a vehicle for portraits of the ideal statesman and a means of making opprobrious comparisons with the

-62-

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