Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite: The American Revolution & the European Response

By Charles W. Toth | Go to book overview

Notes
1
For a discussion of the influence of these dissenting radicals, see Caroline Robbins , TV Eighteenth-Century Commonwealth Man ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1959), pp. 320-377. An invaluable book on an obscure and difficult subject that needs further detailed study.
2
John C. Miller, Origins of the American Revolution ( London, 1945), p. 145. Reprinted by W. W. Norton in 1966. Although it must be recognized at the outset that some factions of the Whigs such as John Wilkes, John Tooke, Joseph Priestley, Richard Price and Catherine Macaulay adopted a liberal, conciliatory position in the dispute between Great Britain and the colonies, it cannot be claimed -- as has so often been done -- that they represented English public opinion. See also Eric Robson, The American Revolution in its Political and Military Aspects, 1763-1783. ( London, 1955), pp. 36, 80. Reprinted by Stanford University Press in 1959.
3
Groups which, I might add in passing, are badly in need of more detailed research, and one can only wish that many European cities had received the same scholarly attention that Carl and Jessica Bridenbaugh have given to Philadelphia. Editor's note: The author is referring here to Rebels and Gentlemen: Philadelphia in the Age of Franklin ( New York, 1942). Reprinted by Greenwood Press in 1978.
4
See N. McKendrick, Transactions of the Royal Historical Society ( 1963). I am deeply indebted to Mr. McKendrick for the transcripts of the Wedgewood MSS here quoted. He will himself deal much more extensively with Wedgewood's political attitudes in his forthcoming book on Wedgewood.
5
R. J. Fitton and A. P. Wadsworth, The Strutts and the Arkwrights, 1758-1780 ( Manchester, 1958), P. 159.
6
George H1. Guttridge, ed., The American Correspondence of a Bristol Merchant, 1766-1776 ( Berkeley, 1934), p. 2.
7
Philip Davidson, Propaganda and the American Revolution, 1763-1783 ( Chapel Hill, 1941), pp. 43-44. Reprinted by W. W. Norton in 1973.
9
Lord Brougham, Historical Sketches of Statesmen who flourished in the time of George III ( London, 1839), I, pp. 303-304.
10
George H. Guttridge, English whiggism and the American Revolution ( Berkeley, 1942), pp. 76-77. Reprinted by AMS Press. Editor's note: Perhaps the most comprehensive study of Whiggism is H. Trevor Colbourn, The Lamp of Experience, Whig History and the Intellectual Origins of the American Revolution ( Chapel Hill, 1965).
11
Editor's note: Still valuable is the earlier study by Dora M. Clark, British Opinion and the American Revolution ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1930 and 1958). Reprinted by Russell Russell in 1966. There was considerable liberty of the press in England at this time and the historian will find in the writings of press and magazines a considerable source for the study of public opinion. See especially F. J. Hinkhouse , Preliminaries of the American Revolution as Seen in the English Press, 1763- 1775. This study was originally published in 1926 but was reprinted by Octagon Press in 1969. Hinkhouse did not include pamphlet material in his study. Also Solomon Lutnick, The American Revolution and the British Press, 1775-1783 ( Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1967).

-78-

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