Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite: The American Revolution & the European Response

By Charles W. Toth | Go to book overview

Notes
1
Edmund C. Burnett, ed., Letters of Members of the Continental Congress, II ( Washington, 1921-1926), pp. 110-111, 135-136. 8 volumes. Editor's note: One of America's most effective agents in the West Indies was William Bingham. See especially Margaret L. Brown, "William Bingham, Agent of the Continental Congress in Martinique", Pennsylvania Magazine of History & Biography, LXI ( 1937), pp. 54-87. R. C. Alberts leans heavily on Brown in The Golden Voyage. The Life & Times of William Bingham ( New York, 1969).
2
See Instructions to the Commissioners in Journals of the Continental Congress, V ( Washington, 1904-1937), pp. 813-817. 34 volumes.
3
The order to John Ross, dated September 27, 1776, is among the manuscripts of the Franklin Collection in the American Philosophical Society.
4
See the author's article "Europe, the Rockingham Whigs, and the War for American Independence: Some Documents", Huntington Library Quarterly, XXV ( 1961). Pages 1-28 lists the British manuscript sources on which the remainder of this paragraph rests.
5
Thomas W. Copeland, (et al), The Correspondence of Edmund Burke, III ( Cambridge, 1961-1964), pp. 305-306. 10 volumes to date.
6
Charles Isham, ed., "The Deane Papers", Collections of the New York Historical Society, II ( New York, 1886), pp. 25-27. 4 volumes. Editor's note. See also Thomas P. Abernethy , "Commercial Activities of Silas Deane in France", American Historical Review, XXXIX ( 1934), pp. 477-485.
7
Trends Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States, II ( Washington, 1889), pp. 325-327. 6 volumes.
8
These paragraphs on privateering and commercial warfare are condensed from the author's documented article "Great Britain, the War for Independence, and the 'Gathering Storm' in Europe, 1775-1778", Huntington Library Quarterly, XXVII ( 1964), pp. 311-346.
9
John Fortescue, ed., The Correspondence of King George III, III ( London, 1928), no. 2049. 6 volumes.
10
While unsigned, there can hardly be a question of this letter's authorship.
11
For the texts of the treaties and notes, see Hunter Miller, ed., Treaties and other International Acts of the United States of America, II ( Washington, 1931-1942), pp. 3-47. 8 volumes.
12
Edmund C. Burnett, ed., Letters of the Members of the continental Congress, III ( Washington, 1921-1936), pp. 235-237. 5 volumes. Editor's note: Valuable with respect to the treaty is William E. Stinchcombe, The American Revolution and the French Alliance ( Syracuse, 1969), and Jonathan R. Dull, A Diplomatic History of the American Revolution ( New Haven, 1985).

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