America's Foreign Relations - Vol. 2

By Willis Fletcher Johnson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXV
SETTLEMENTS AND UNSETTLEMENTS

THE early years of the twentieth century were marked with the settlement by the United States of a number of long- pending controversies and with a perceptible advance of this nation in friendship and intimacy with most of the countries of the world. By far the most noteworthy was the approachment which was effected between the United States and Great Britain. Between those countries, naturally, intercourse had from the first been most direct, transactions had been most frequent and important, friction had at times been most acute, and controversies had been most earnest and persistent. At the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth various circumstancs conduced irresistibly to the prevalence of a cordial feeling between them which amounted to little less than an unwritten alliance. Chief among these were the attitude of Great Britain toward America in the Spanish war, the attitude and sentiment of America toward Great Britain in the Boer war, the sympathy and coöperation between them in the Far East, and the personal influence of a number of statesmen in each country. On the British side Joseph Chamberlain, the Unionist leader and secretary of state for the colonies, and Lord Pauneefote, Sir Michael Herbert, and James Bryce, afterward Lord Bryce, ambassadors to the United States, were particularly influential; while on the American side the work of cultivating and confirming friendship was performed with signal felicity and efficiency by a distinguished succession of ambassadors, including John Hay, Joseph H. Choate, and Whitelaw Reid.

The chief issue between the two countries at this time remaining unsettled was the oldest of all, namely, that of American rights in the North Atlantic coastal fisheries. This had been a leading issue in the making of peace at the end of the Revolution, and again at the end of the War of 1812, and had been

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America's Foreign Relations - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents of Volume II iii
  • Portraits in Volume II ix
  • Xxi the Civil War--Neutrality 3
  • Xxii the Civil War--Intervention 28
  • Xxiii Some North American Complications 51
  • Xxiv British Relations 75
  • Xxv Dealings with British America 95
  • Xxvi Some Diplomatic Miscellany 116
  • Xxvii Embroilment at Samoa 136
  • Xxviii the Annexation of Hawaii 161
  • Xxix Latin-American Neighbors 185
  • Xxx Dealings with the Far East 211
  • Xxxi the War with Spain 237
  • Xxxii Results of the War 259
  • Xxxiii Later Relations with the Far East 281
  • Xxxiv the Isthmian Canal 306
  • Chapter XXXV Settlements and Unsettlements 327
  • Xxxvi War and Peace 353
  • Appendices 381
  • Index 453
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