Willard Cochrane and the American Family Farm

By Richard A. Levins | Go to book overview

Foreword

John Kenneth Galbraith

In my early life I escaped the oft-described civility and less celebrated labor of a family farm into agricultural economics. I was concerned with agricultural policy; it produced one of my more notable comments from John F. Kennedy when he was president or a presidential candidate. It was, "I don't want to hear about agricultural policy from anybody but you, Ken, and I don't want to hear about it from you either." I was, thereafter, more reticent on this subject, but Kennedy did not escape. The continuing problem of the small or mid-size farm and its survival in a world of great corporate enterprises continued. It could not be wished away and the principal source of recommendation and guidance came through Kennedy's Secretary of Agriculture, the former Minnesota Governor Orville Freeman, and ultimately from Willard Cochrane. This was not his first guidance; nor was it his last. No one else in the last thirty or forty years has been so intelligently influential. And as so often in agricultural matters, this is history that has been sadly neglected. This book fills the large gap. Richard Levins has told of the life and public career of Willard Cochrane, also his academic life, but he has done much more. He has given a vivid account of the context in which Willard Cochrane's thought and policy were relevant. Particular attention is given to the big corporations which surround and invade the farm scene and which, with their greater market power, are the problem of the traditional farmer. All of this is done with care and in good, clear English. I have the greatest pleasure in giving the book a strong recommendation.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Willard Cochrane and the American Family Farm
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments x
  • 1 - Family Farms in Form but Not in Spirit 1
  • 2 - The Golden Age 13
  • 3 - The Treadmill 26
  • 4 - Professor Cochrane Goes to Washington. 44
  • 5 - An Unreconstructed Liberal 62
  • 6 - Heartland 79
  • Notes 83
  • Selected Writings of Willard Cochrane, 1939-1997 85
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 88

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.