CREDITS

Over the course of a century--justly or not--the terms PR and public relations have become widely accepted shorthand for subterfuge and deception. Between the lines of any book about the rise of public relations, then, exist unavoidable issues of honesty.

This having been said, I feel compelled to testify that the presence of one individual's name on the title page of this book is--as is often the situation with books and other such creations--somewhat misleading. Creative work is invariably sustained by vital collaborations, and in the case of this book this has been especially true. With this in mind, and to correct any such misconceptions, I embrace the chance to acknowledge those people whose forbearance and friendship have allowed me to write the book you are about to read.

First among my collaborators is Elizabeth Ewen. For about thirty years, Liz has scrutinized nearly every word I have written for publication. She has helped me to understand when I am communicating effectively, when I am not. Her ideas and insights have informed mine. She has been my most discerning editor and audience. Her prodigious capacity to read--to reflect critically on what she is reading--have helped me to become a writer. To take a phrase from the novelist Richard Powers, this "book is the dance card of ideas we shared in the foyer of our joint life."

Unlike Liz, some of my collaborators are doubtless unaware of the contributions they have made to this book. Much of my research, for example, was done fairly anonymously at the New York Public Library; the Wexler Library of Hunter College; the libraries at Princeton and Columbia universities; the AT&T Corporate Archive at Warren, New Jersey; and at the NAM Archive at the Hagley Museum and Library in Wilmington, Delaware. In each case, these libraries and their staffs-- by providing their customary services--helped me enormously.

In certain instances, however, librarians or archivists went beyond the call of duty, taking a special interest in this project. Ron Sexton--

-viii-

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